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Quentin Noirhomme

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Quentin Noirhomme PhD Engineer, joined the Coma Science Group in 2007. His reasearches focus on finding new diagnosis and prognosis measures based functional neuroimaging (mainly EEG, fMRI) for patients with disorders of consciousness, studying complexity of the signal as well as changes in functional and effective connectivity and developping Brain-computer interface (BCI) for detecting response to command and communication in disabled patients.

He coordinated for Liège the European project DECODER (Deployment of Brain-Computer Interfaces for the Detection of Consciousness in Non-Responsive Patients).

He received the Applied Mathematics Engineering degree and the Ph. D. degree from the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL) Louvain-la- Neuve, Belgium in 2001 and 2006 respectively. He made his Ph.D. under the supervision of Professor B. Macq at the Communications and Remote Sensing Laboratory. During the year 2003, he was a visiting scientist at the Biomedical department of Imperial College London where he worked under the supervision of Professor R. I. Kitney. His Ph.D was on localisation of brain functions using Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) and Electroencephalography (EEG). In collaboration with the team of Professor E. Olivier (UCL/NEFY), he conceived a software to localise the TMS point on a subject MRI in real-time. Enabling fast and accurate localisation of the stimulation. He then turned on developping a Brain-computer Interface (BCI) based on a neurophysiological prior: the reconstructed sources of brain activity. During the summer 2005, he made a short incursion in the musical world by leading a project on a Biologically driven musical instrument at the eNTERFACE'05 workshop.

From 2006 to 2007, he was a postdoctoral researcher at the Electrical NeuroImaging Group of Hôpitaux Universitaires de Genève (Geneva, Switzerland). Under the supervision of Sara Gonzalez Andino and Rolando Graves de Peralta, he worked on a steady-state visually evoked potential BCI which enabled to control a virtual wheelchair and to be virtually present in the lab of Professor M. Nuttin (Leuven, Belgium) through a robot called Maktub. He also worked on the detection of Very High Frequency Oscillations in EEG spectrum for diverse applications.

 

Find here his short and long CV. His full list of publications can be found on the University of Liege repository , on pubmed, on our website, on google scholar and on scopus .